"If we find nothing, we will find nothing in a place; and then, that an absence is not nothing, but is rather the space left by what has gone: how the emptiness indicates how once it was filled and animated."
— Carolyn Steedman, Dust, 2001
"Tylorstown (Welsh: Pendyrus) is a village and community located in the Rhondda valley, in the county borough of Rhondda Cynon Taf, Wales. It was founded by Alfred Tylor who set up an early coal mining operation in the location in the mid-19th century."
Wikipedia

So what does Pendyrus mean? Head of something? Is it like a warped version of Penrhys and Rus is supposed to be some kind of alternate spelling? Can anyone help me out, please? =)
"In Welsh Ferndale is known as Glynrhedynog. The Welsh word Glynrhedynog is made from the words “glyn” meaning valley and “rhedynog” meaning ferny, and so coal from the Glynrhedynog pits was marketed as Ferndale coal, a much easier name for English buyers to assimilate. The Ferndale pits are what drew the workforce and their families to the area, and by the 1880s “Ferndale” was well established as a thriving town."
""Maerdy" is a Welsh word meaning "house of the mayor", and may indicate a medieval origin. The "mayor" was the official also known as the reeve, usually the most affluent farmer in the area. However the original ancient Welsh meaning of Maerdy is Slave house (Maer -Slave , Dy - House). The name is found in several locations throughout Wales and may well indicate the site of Dark age slave markets.The use of the word ‘Mardy’ in colloquial English to describe a sullen and sulky individual would appear to stem from the old Welsh word for slave."
Wikipedia

I
 can’t find any more references to “maer” meaning “slave” though. Can any fluent speakers let me know if this is correct?

Another edited picture. This time it’s of my father. I created the patch because this photo was one of the ones people seemed to like the most; they called it striking ((much to my Dad’s delight)) and pointed out how alike we look.

I used grease proof paper instead of fabric in this to try and start experimenting with more materials; it’s only a small jump, but I like how the paper looks old and rustic because of the colour.

I left out his face as a form of transformation to try and make my family history project easier for other people to relate to. I also think this adds to how striking it does look - because it makes his eyes the prominent feature.

To edit the photo, I cleaned up the background, altered the levels, and then boosted the saturation of the yellow thread slightly. 

Here is yet another photo enhancement. This one is of my final piece. To improve this photograph I cropped the image, removed paint marks and blue tack stains from the wall, and altered the levels.

This is the photo enhancement that I think has been the most successful; this was probably because I had tried to display the work well in the first place. The previous images had thumb tacks in them, and dangling threads, which made them look messy. This one is much better presented.

Here is another enhanced image. For this one I cleared some clutter from the background and altered the levels. I also straightened the edge of the patch.

This was one of my attempts at a solvent lift. For some reason, it didn’t work very well, despite the fact I tried multiple solvents, multiple methods of applying the solvent, and used rollers to try and make the transfer.

These photos show some editing work I have done in Photoshop, to improve the appearance of photographs of my work. I still need a lot of practise in this, but hopefully you can see the difference between the two images.

The changes are small, but I have removed a mark off the wall, and also the top edge of another patch of my quilt that you can see below this one. I also edited the levels and colours of the image slightly, to try and improve the contrast, and also make the image look more vibrant.

This patch depicts the shop owned by my great-great-grandmother, as I found out in the 1911 census record for her family. I am quite proud of her for having her own business, considering traditional gender roles of that period; her husband was still alive and working while she ran the shop, so they seem like a hard working family in general.

I am happy with the aesthetics of this patch, and am hoping to develop my work to contain more layering of fabrics like this.

Last week we had a photography workshop, and for this module we have been asked to include photographs of what we took during that morning. Most of my photos were of other people’s work, or other people’s faces, which I am a bit wary of posting, but here is a photograph I took using the techniques we were taught about during that session.
This is a very rough, very inaccurate WIP of Cymmer Colliery. I have included this in my project work ((based on family history)) as, according to some information given to be by my cousin, my great-grandfather was injured while working as a traffic manager in this colliery.

Last week we had a photography workshop, and for this module we have been asked to include photographs of what we took during that morning. Most of my photos were of other people’s work, or other people’s faces, which I am a bit wary of posting, but here is a photograph I took using the techniques we were taught about during that session.

This is a very rough, very inaccurate WIP of Cymmer Colliery. I have included this in my project work ((based on family history)) as, according to some information given to be by my cousin, my great-grandfather was injured while working as a traffic manager in this colliery.